The MOT rules changed in 2018 after which nearly 10 million vehicles failed the test in the first year of the change, which is about one in three cars in the UK. There were many reasons for these, but the most significant one was that the rules and systems used for testing cars were old and in most cases, outdated. They now upgraded them to meet the requirements of modern-day vehicles and to match all their features.

MOT tests check on three broad categories of all vehicles, roadworthiness, safety and emissions. The highest percentage of cars that failed the test since they did not meet the new emissions standard.

The cars failing the MOT emissions tests, to improve air quality and make roads safer, more than doubled. Nearly 750,000 vehicles failed the emissions test in six months after the change, compared to 350,000 during the same period the previous year. Additionally, according to the figures released by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), the number of diesel cars failing the emissions test rose from 3,585 to 19,648 year-on-year.

Since the rules relating to diesel vehicles got stricter, the MOT tests now had tighter smoke limits. They also made changes to the way they handled the review. The new fail categories state that vehicles that were marked dangerous should not be on the road until they repair the dangerous defect.

Additionally, there were several components and functions tested for the first time under the refreshed regulations.

Motorists could receive a fined up to £1,000 for driving a vehicle without a valid MOT.   Additionally, during the time from 30th March to 31st July, when the MOT was delayed because of the Coronavirus pandemic, vehicles that were not roadworthy and found on the roads could be fined up to double the amount, £2,000.

They found that the introduction of the new tighter MOT emissions test in May, caused nearly 750,000 vehicles have been taken off the road or fixed.

The various review categories for an MOT test are now, minor, major or dangerous, which were designed to make it simpler for motorists to know if their vehicle is safe to drive. Another significant role they served was allowing vehicle owners to know where their vehicle’s stood and how they should tackle repairs the next time that they visit a garage. Vehicles marked ‘minor’  need to consider getting the issue rectified at the soonest but can pass the test. Vehicles marked ‘major’, need to consider getting the issue fixed sooner and would also clear the test. However, vehicles marked dangerous could only get through the test after solving the problem.

People are now allowed to boook MOT online to save them time at the garage since the UK is still dealing with backlogs. For people who did not want to use the internet, garages allowed their customers to book MOT, and they could come back in time to get their vehicles repaired and tested.

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